Bog Garden

Photo Gallery of Bog Garden


THE BOG GARDEN AT THE “GARDEN SANCTUARY”
This series of pictures highlights our bog garden. We are extremely proud to have such a successful and healthy one. We especially want to thank Fred Case for his advice and information needed to put an artificial habitat like this together. We are happy to pass this information on to you. At the bottom of the page we will explain how it is done.

THE HEALTHY “LIVE SPHAGNUM” BOG GARDEN
Live sphagnum moss and an orchid, Pagonia ophioglossoides or better known as the “Rose Pagonia” dominates our Bog Garden. We have two forms Of the Rose Pagonia at present the “light pink” and “dark pink”. We also display a good number of Sarracenia species and sundews as shown in the picture.

PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN NATIVE
Almost appearing to be standing at attention, Pagonia ophioglossoides looks happy underneath the “Stars and Stripes” here at the “Garden Sanctuary”. Also included are three Calopogon tuberosus var. albaflorus, thankfully blooming at the same time. Sorry about the much-needed fence in the back ground, the public, when visiting are often not looking or don’t understand what they are seeing and step right into it. EEEKKK!

 

Calopogon TUBEROSUS var. TUBEROSUS
This is a standard form Calopogon tuberosus var. tuberosus or better known as “grass pinks”. You can see why.

ELEPOGON CARSON WHITLOW
This is a hybrid between Eleorchis japonica and Calopogon tuberosus. In the foreground is a hybrid Sarracenia.

 

Calopogon TUBEROSUS var. ALBAFLORUS
Featured here is Calopogon tuberosus var. albaflorus starting to peek during its bloom.

POGONIA OPHIOGLOSSOIDES “Dark Pink Form”
At their peak bloom in this picture these beauties look almost like pink butterflies fluttering in front of the camera.

POGONIA OPHIOGLOSSOIDES “Light Pink Form” POGONIA OPHIOGLOSSOIDES “Dark Pink Form”

 


CREATING A BOG GARDEN:

Materials:

  • Shovel and Scissors

  • Pond liner

  • Sand stone; or stone that is inert [No lime stone].

  • Silica sand

  • Live sphagnum moss

  • Your choice of bog plants

Create an artificial pond with a liner that is [at least two feet deep if you want to incorporate pond fish]. Before you install the liner, dig an indention on the side of it that is at least two feet by two feet by 6 inches deep.

  • Put your one-piece pond liner in it, covering your new indention and the rest of the pond hole.

  • Fill it only with rainwater, or lime free well water, or distilled or deionized water.

  • Absolutely no lime or limestone or chlorine can be present in the water or stone surrounding the pond area.

  • Put sand stone pieces anywhere between the size of a shoe or a fist and smaller in a row on the edge of the larger pond opening about 8 inches wide and 6 inches tall. This will create a barrier where the indention drops from 6 inches down to the 2ft. deeper area.

  • Put strips of pond liner that are left over along the sand stones. Put them on the inside of the indention and at the bottom of the stones. This will help prevent silica sand from washing into the larger pond area.

  • Now fill your indented area/bog with pure silica sand about an inch or two deep.

  • Put live sphagnum moss that you must find from a real existing bog on top of that sand. *Please note that when you get this moss that it is as pure as you can get it with no other plants growing in it. You will find cleaner moss in areas, near a woods or around shadier areas of an existing natural bog. Pack the moss in the way that it grows, right to the sand stone barrier you created at the edge of the pond indention. Some parts may die down but if you follow these instructions then it will start to rejuvenate in a few weeks and begin to recover.

  • You now have a live sphagnum moss bog garden at the edge of your pond. Now you may begin to populate it with bog garden plants of your choice. When undesirable plants begin to grow or seeds germinate in it, make sure that they are gotten rid of immediately because they can take over easily.

MAINTENANCE OF THE BOG GARDEN

Remember that this bog garden is artificial. If water levels go down because of evaporation, then it is time to flush this bog by allowing water to flow through the bog at one end and into the pond till it is full again. Keeping this water level to the top of the pond is extremely important in maintaining a healthy bog. Never use chlorinated or limy water as stated above. You will risk destroying the acidic condition, needed to keep a bog alive.